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Lupo Superpanel vs Socanland NOVA-CTD 100w vs F&V K400s Light Output Test

I recently received the Lupo Superpanel 1x1 LED and I wanted to test it's output against a couple other LED panels that we had laying around the shop; the Socanland NOVA-CTD 100w 60 degree 1x1 and the F&V K4000s. I knew that on paper the Superpanel was suppose to be much brighter but I wanted to see it put to the test.

All the lights are bi-color so I conducted the test in 5600K (daylight), 3200K (tungsten) and also at 4400K. The results were interesting!

The Lupo Superpanel was by far the brightest of the three.  It was a full 3 stops brighter than the Socanland NOVA-CTD and a whooping 5.5 stops brighter than the F&V K4000s.  But here it is by the numbers:

temperature_Superpanel  temperature_Socanland  temperature_F&V

You can see by the numbers that both the Lupo Superpanel and the Socanland NOVA-CTD only vary slightly between 5600K, 3200K and 4400K but the F&V K4000s is a different story.  It varies widely between the color temperature which means that you'll need to either change your camera's exposure or change the output of light whenever you change the color temperature - which is a pain if you're trying to quickly warm/cool a shot.

One easy way to really grasp the output difference was the distance I stood away from the lights to get the same exposure levels.  For the test I left the camera at the same exposure level and color balance for all the lights.  I stood 10 feet from the camera for The Lupo Superpanel.  I had to move up to 5 feet from the camera to get the same exposure on my face with the Socanland NOVE-CTD.  And finally I had to stand 2 feet away from the camera to get the same exposure on me with the F&V K4000s.  I do need to say that this is an older F&V LED panel that we have.  I know the new ones outputs are rated higher - but certainly not 5.5 stops brighter.  I should also note the the F&V K4000s has an obvious green tint to it.

Personally I'm not a big fan of lighting talent with straight LED bulbs.  I always go through some sort of diffusion and if you're shooting beauty, then the bigger (size-wise) the better.  This means you need a powerful LED to give you the required output.  I was curious about how different thicknesses of diffusion worked on the Lupo Superpanel.  Here's my results:

In a true beauty lighting situation I would use a larger 4'x4' frame and place it further from the light.  This will give you a real soft wrap around light.

Superpanel_BatterTest

I also wanted to test how long my Power-U 150Wh/14.4VV-mount battery would last at full power at 5600K.  At the beginning of the test the EV came to 10.7 (12 feet away). At 30 minutes the EV began to drop and at 35 minutes the EV went down to 10.2. For reference, I had to move forward 2 feet to get back to 10.7 EV's. But what's interesting is that it held at 10.2 EV's for ANOTHER HOUR. So at 1:30 I was still reading 10.2 on the meter. When I went to check it at 1:40 the EV's had dropped to 9.9 and then a minute later the light started flickering on and off. So the bottom line is you can get at least 1 and a half hours of run-time on the Superpanel with a 150Wh battery - with a slight drop at 30 - 40 minute mark.

There is a slight difference in output when you switch from plug-in power to batteries.  When I plugged the Superpanel into the wall after my battery test I received at 10.9 EV instead of a 10.7 EV.  That equates to the light being about 1 foot closer at the 12 foot mark.

I hope this has been helpful.  These are tests that I was interested in doing for my own knowledge and I thought others might be interested.  I am not at all affiliated with Lupolux but I am a fan boy.  Lupo lights are now available in the US through Brightline at brightline.myshopify.com

About Scott Leslie

Scott Leslie is a respected award winning TV Producer with 20 years experience and owner of Eugene Scott Productions, Inc. Since graduating from UCSD in 1993, Scott has been immersed in the film and video industry. In his early years he worked on several films a an assistant cameraman, b-camera operator and eventually a director of photography. In 1996 he opened Eugene Scott Productions, which mainly focuses on direct response commercials but is also involved in music DVDs and documentaries, a children's show, and health show programming. Scott directed over 50 episodes of Responsible Health, a weekly health talk show, and Eugene Scott Productions was responsible for all the post production. He has also produced and directed a children's fun and education DVD, Kibbles Rockin' Clubhouse. Scott also directed and produced Sign of the Dragon, an award winning kid's action adventure/magic short film. Scott has garnished several Telly Awards as a Producer/Director and as an editor for clients such as Jenny Craig, Vistage Connect and others.

12 Responses to "Lupo Superpanel vs Socanland NOVA-CTD 100w vs F&V K400s Light Output Test"

  • Carlos Yap
    March 25, 2017 - 11:46 pm Reply

    Excellent reviews, question.. how do you battery power the superpanles? I have sony vmounts, is there an adapter to plug in two to power the unit? How long would they last?

    • esproductions
      March 25, 2017 - 12:54 pm Reply

      Good question. I just did a test with a 150Wh/14.4V v-mount battery and with the Superpanel at 100% power at 5600K. At the beginning of the test the EV came to 10.7 (12 feet away). At 30 minutes the EV began to drop and at 35 minutes the EV went down to 10.2. For reference, I had to move forward 2 feet to get back to 10.7 EV’s. But what’s interesting is that it held at 10.2 EV’s for ANOTHER HOUR. So at 1:30 I was still reading 10.2 on the meter. When I went to check it at 1:40 the EV’s had dropped to 9.9 and then a minute later the light started flickering on and off.

  • Carlos Yap
    March 26, 2017 - 12:55 pm Reply

    Great thanks. what were your camera settings? iso, shutter aperture. if i can ask

  • esproductions
    March 26, 2017 - 6:04 pm Reply

    I was shooting UHD on a Sony A7s ii on a Cine2 profile. My ISO was 100 and my f-stop started at 5.6 (with the 216 diffusion) and went up to 8.0 (with no diffusion in front of the light). My frame rate was 29.97 with 1/60 shutter speed.

  • Alex López
    March 27, 2017 - 4:46 pm Reply

    Nice demo, thank you!

    • Scott Leslie
      March 27, 2017 - 4:49 pm Reply

      Thanks! I’m always the one behind the camera and not in front of it, so I’m certainly no skilled talent but I think the information came across. Glad you liked it.

  • Peter Foggy
    March 29, 2017 - 4:52 pm Reply

    Thanks for your effort in testing this light. I’m still going through my own tests. I’ll get a chance to use it in an interview next week. I do believe the accessories like a barn door should come with the purchase.

    • Scott Leslie
      March 29, 2017 - 4:55 pm Reply

      I just received my barn doors for the Superpanel the other day. They’re large and solid metal so you can easily hang diffusion off of them if you don’t have room/time to set up a frame. I would certainly recommend that you shoot the Superpanel through some type of diffusion or silk to soften it up. Because the light is so bright you can easily punch through any diffusion.

  • Peter Foggy
    March 29, 2017 - 4:56 pm Reply

    That light is like trying to tame a wild bronco! It blasts through my silk like it’s not even there. The best look that I found is when I bounce it off a white reflector or board. I had ordered grid cloth to see what kind of effect it will have. It’s power gives you a lot of versatility.

    • Scott Leslie
      March 29, 2017 - 4:59 pm Reply

      LOL! Too true. Let me know what you end up doing on your interview.

  • David Murphey
    February 7, 2018 - 10:14 pm Reply

    Thanks for the awesome review! I’m looking to switch over to Lupo’s after using Litepanels. I like the output of the Astra 6X, but the Astras are so fragile. I’ve had 3 Litepanels break in the last 4 years. I’m not rough on gear. My panel lights get transported in hard cases, but it seems just the slight bumping around inside the case while I’m driving my car seems to rattle the electronics loose. The Lupo looks to be better made, with a stronger body.

    • Scott Leslie
      February 8, 2018 - 4:13 pm Reply

      I’ve had a couple of Superpanels for over a year and I have them in soft cases. They’ve been on a ton of shoots with me including an intense feature film shoot. I haven’t had a single problem with them. The have a technopolymer body that’s reinforced with carbon fibre. Great instruments!

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